Neurotechnology Uncovers Millions of Duplicate Records for Congo Election Commission

“The company also applied biometric age analysis technology to the facial records to flag the records of registered voters who may have been underage, leading to the confirmation of 900,000 noncompliant voter records.”

Neurotechnology has made a considerable impact in the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s democratic process. The company has announced that its multimodal biometric matching technology has helped to uncover 5.3 million duplicate voter records.Neurotechnology Uncovers Millions of Duplicate Records for Congo Election Commission

It was a big job. At the behest of the DRC’s Independent National Electoral Commission, Neurotechnology deployed its MegaMatcher Automated Biometric Identification System and its MegaMatcher Accelerator Extreme matching engine, which together compared 46.5 million facial records against 46.6 million fingerprint records. It required the processing power of 11 servers over several weeks, but ultimately produced great success in the electoral commission’s deduplication effort.

The company also applied biometric age analysis technology to the facial records to flag the records of registered voters who may have been underage, leading to the confirmation of 900,000 noncompliant voter records.

In a statement announcing the achievement, electoral the head of the DRC’s election commission, Corneille Nangaa Yobeluo, praised Neurotechnology for its speed in the successful project, stating, “Neurotechnology helped us achieve our goals and exceeded our expectations by starting and completing the deduplication process in record time, and they were able to identify millions of duplicates.”

The company places a strong focus on technological prowess, and recently attained high rankings for the speed of its iris recognition technology in National Institute of Standards and Technology testing. In the DRC, its software looks to be making a substantial impact ahead of nationwide elections in which constituencies are represented based on their voter populations.

April 24, 2018 – by Alex Perala