CBP Brings Biometric ‘Simplified Arrival’ System to Detroit Airport

“The CBP’s system is designed to biometrically match the faces of these travelers against the images in their travel documents, allowing the agency to verify their identities quickly and reliably.”

CBP Brings Biometric 'Simplified Arrival' System to Detroit Airport

US Customs and Border Protection has expanded its use of facial recognition technology to another major US airport, announcing that its now being used to verify travelers at the Detroit Metropolitan Airport (DTW).

The technology isn’t being used on all travelers, with the border control agency indicating that its system is currently being applied to international arrivals. The CBP’s system is designed to biometrically match the faces of these travelers against the images in their travel documents, allowing the agency to verify their identities quickly and reliably.

The CBP has brought this kind of biometric security to a number airports across the country; but with a growing level of public scrutiny over government use of facial recognition technology, the agency now appears to be intensifying its efforts to effectively market its use of biometric border control tech and win over public opinion, branding DTW’s system “Simplified Arrival”.

“Facial comparison technology is used because it seamlessly integrates into the airport environment and is easy to use for travelers and facilitates the flow of legitimate travel,” the agency explained in a statement announcing the deployment. “Face comparison technology also strengthens National Security by reducing the risk that an imposter uses a lost or stolen travel document to enter or exit the United States.”

The CBP also noted that US citizens who don’t wish to be photographed using the biometric security system can ask for “alternative means of processing.”

The deployment is part of a growing worldwide trend as government agencies and air travel stakeholders around the world look to the benefits of biometric passenger screening in terms of throughput and security.

September 26, 2019 – by Alex Perala