Multiple US State Government ID Programs Supported By manageID Cloud

Multiple US states are going to be benefiting from cloud based identity services now that manageID is supporting the state government ID programs with its manageID Cloud platform. manageID Cloud has been in operation since 2012 and supports a wide range of customizable security documents, IDs and credentials.

Identity Management in the Cloud

manageID Cloud is especially useful in terms of the emerging bring your own credential movement, allowing smartphones or wearable devices to act as privileged access documents.

The long list of credentials and IDs supported by manageID Cloud – and therefore managed for the multiple states now using the service – include voter IDs, weapons licenses, birth certificates, death certificates, marriage licenses, trade licenses and certificates, hunting and fishing licenses, construction permits.

Rajpal Kalsi, manageID’s product manager, says, “We are confident manageID Cloud is pioneering the hosting of critical government identity data across state lines. manageID Cloud’s subscription business model and ultra-secure technical architecture enables county and state governments to both eliminate upfront capital investment and significantly reduce ongoing overhead for credentialing programs saving taxpayers’ money. Moreover, our customers automatically get access to service updates and software improvements eliminating lifecycle costs and risks associated with system procurement and upgrades.”

Currently managing about 15,000 new or renewal identity and credential records per month in the US state governments in question, manageID Cloud is based on the manageID Framework. As such, it supports a variety of transaction and customer types across government and commercial arenas. It can issue various IDs, tokens privileges and endorsements as well as link privileges to existing credentials. This second feature is especially useful in terms of the emerging bring your own credential movement, allowing smartphones or wearable devices to act as privileged access documents.

August 13, 2014 – by Peter B. Counter