Dutch ID Documents Get Biometric Upgrade From Morpho

“This has enabled us to design highly secure biometric documents that meet the government’s specific needs while complying with strict industry standards.”

SafranIn order to provide greater protection against fraud, the Dutch government has been working closely with Morpho (Safran), developing next generation secure biometric travel documents and identity cards. The new IDs incorporate the latest in secure document technology features and are valid for ten years.

“We have a longstanding relationship with the Dutch government and a clear understanding of their document security challenges,” says Jessica Westerouen van Meeteren, executive vice president of Morpho’s Government Identity Solutions Division. “This has enabled us to design highly secure biometric documents that meet the government’s specific needs while complying with strict industry standards.”

Among the new features on the Dutch IDs is Morpho’s patented Stereo Laser Image technology (SLI). Placed on the document data page, SLI is a three-dimensional portrait of the document holder. Designed to check the authenticity of the primary image, the SLI feature aids in preventing photo falsification.

Also added to the new arsenal of security features is the Tilted Laser Number (TLN). Also called a laser perforated number, the TLN is only visible when tilted against the light and is located on the primary image.

With the rise in secure travel documents comes a decrease in fraud, of course, but it also is a sign of changes in border control and national ID. Recently, reports concerning the automated border control markets have shown that biometric solutions providing greater security and traveler convenience are growing, especially in Europe.

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In April, Morpho (Safran) announced its partnership with rapid DNA technology and solutions provider IntegenX. The team-up will see Morpho marketing its partner’s RapidHIT System to government and law enforcement agencies in multiple countries.

June 24, 2014 – by Peter B. Counter